Multimodal Tutorial for Turnitin.com

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At the start of each school year, I spend time introducing my students to Turnitin.com, a program that I use to allow students to upload and submit their work. In addition to being a plagiarism checker, the program itself has some interesting features, including commenting, checking for grammar/usage and peer revision. There is also a way to link common core rubrics to an assignment for assessment purposes. Although I have dabbled in using most of its features, I would have to say that within the context of my classroom, Turnitin.com serves two primary purposes: it is a plagiarism checker and a database for storing student papers.

I am pretty excited about this multimodal tutorial because it is definitely something that I will use during the first week of school.  In it,  I teach students how to create a new account and upload an assignment. My primary audience is ninth graders who are new to Turnitin.com.

Multimodal Tutorial for Turnitin.com

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3 thoughts on “Multimodal Tutorial for Turnitin.com

  1. Good work..and great use of screenshots…and playing with Canva. 🙂

    The tutorial is easy to follow and provides great guidance for users. My only helpful advice would be to zoom in on the browser a bit as you create the screenshots. It makes it easier to read…and follow what you’re pointing to. I still struggle with this. I’m sure you’ll be better at it than I am. 🙂

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    • What a great tool for Language Arts teachers! I really like the idea of having everything you need right at your computer/device. You can retrieve the information anywhere and not have to carry excess baggage. Checking for plagiarism is a very interesting feature. Does this help the students to be more aware of how they submit their content?

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      • I present it as a tool to help students see their work through the lens of evidence. When they submit their work, it tells them how much of their paper is “quoted” material. That way, they see the amount of evidence that they use and we have conversations about appropriate amounts, as well as giving attribution. Using this program is a department-wide practice and I have found it to be very useful in having those conversations.

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